Waterville: Ayla Reynolds Missing; Bring missing toddler Ayla Reynolds home Items recovered in Waterville'

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JustaMainah
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Dad knows where she is.

Dad knows where she is.

charlie neville
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That's quite an accusation.

That's quite an accusation. Care to substantiate it?

charlie

Spider
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Given what you know about the

Given what you know about the situation. What would you expect a grandmother to do?
Protect the child. That is my speculation.

JustaMainah
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Let me rephrase my

Let me rephrase my statement.... It is my opinion that Justin knows where his daughter is. Carefully note that I did not say that he was specifically involved in her disappearance, just that I believe he knows where she is. I "do" behavior for a living... observing and interpreting human behavior, then, by virtue of my position, modifying it, is my gig. It's what I do. I am not a "criminal profiler" but I do have a B.S. in Criminal Justice, a B.A. in Social Sciences, and several grad courses in behavioral analysis. I currently work with adolescents who have been incarcerated in youth detention facilities and/or psychiatric units, and are at risk for further criminal behavior and/or at risk for victimization. As I watched the interview with Justin, I did what I always do, watch for signs of deception and nervousness, listened to his voice patterns, and perhaps most importantly in this case, listened for the questions he DIDN'T answer. His performance was definitely coached, probably by an attorney, but some things we just can't keep our body from doing because they are unconscious responses to stressful situations. I won't bore you with all the details. I admit my earlier post was overly flippant and accusatory... my apologies.

charlie neville
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I believe very possibly

I believe very possibly you're correct, JustaMainah. And thank you for your background info. If he knows isn't he committing a crime by keeping it to himself? What's your opinion of the mother? I've thought this a custody issue from the beginning.

charlie

woodcanoe
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I believe it has been said,

I believe it has been said, at some point, as part of the investigation, that ALL the people in the home that night were offered a lie detector test. I wonder if the dad took one.

WC

Tom C
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The police said at one point

The police said at one point that they were fairly certain that the child hadn't wandered away, and that they thought someone had taken the child. If that's the case, I'm surprised they haven't fingered someone at this point.

Jim Corr
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WC, based on my own

WC, based on my own experience I had posted that all present would have been thoroughly interviewed and offered polygraphs to corroborate their stories and to eliminate them as suspects. That's a pretty routine practice. We have no way of knowing which ones may have taken it, and that is not something the police are going to share. If someone took the poly and failed, or refused to take one then the police will focus on those individuals while still following up on other leads developed. A lot of behind the scenes work is taking place that is not obvious to the general public.

JustaMainah
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And refusal to take a

And refusal to take a polygraph is absolutely NOT something the cops can formally use against any of the parties involved nor impugn their character. Besides, a poly doesn't help much if the subject is not asked the right questions or if they are a skilled sociopath.

Jim Corr
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You're right. The poly is

You're right. The poly is nothing more than an investigative tool. I haven't had any experience with the MSP examiners, but with the examiners I have had experience with they are excellent interrogators and very skilled in their craft. A very valuable tool in cases like this.

JustaMainah
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Statistically speaking, the

Statistically speaking, the likelihood of Ayla having been abducted by a stranger in the middle of the night in a dwelling occupied by a young, strong male as well as other adults in a populated area is almost nil. Of the close to 400,000,000 people living in the U.S., about 71,000,000 are children under the age of 18, or about 18% of the population. About 58,000 children a year go missing in what are called non-family abductions but to clarify that can include a lot of scenarios that are not necessarily the "stereotypical" abduction. A stereotypical abduction is defined as "a nonfamily abduction perpetrated by a slight acquaintance or stranger in which a child is detained overnight, transported at least 50 miles, held for ransom or abducted with intent to keep the child permanently, or killed"*. Out of those 58,000, only an average of about 115 or 0.23% of all abducted children are considered the stereotypical stranger abduction. Most stranger abductions are also older children, only 20 of the 115, or 17% of those stereotypical stranger abductions, or 20 of the 58,000 or 0.04% of nationwide abducted children, or 20 of the 70,000,000 or 0.00000029% of all US children, are stranger-abducted children under the age of 6. The percentage is even lower if you break it down by regions of the country and lower still in winter months. See where I'm going with this?

To sum up, the likelihood of Ayla having been stolen out of her home in the middle of a cold December night by some random stranger is very low, which if you follow the rest of the statistics is a very, very good thing... close to half of the victims of stereotypical child abduction are sexually abused. 44% of those victims of stereotypical stranger abduction are killed or never located and nearly all of the stranger abductions in which the children survived were resolved in less than 24 hours.... For her sake, I certainly hope that little Ayla is indeed safe in the arms of someone known to the family. Her chances are much better that way.

*Department of Justice Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention NCJRS report

Philip Roy
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Video Ayla’s mom says

Video

Ayla’s mom says toddler’s father isn’t telling ‘the whole truth’

>>>>>>>>>>>Snip...............................
Reynolds criticized DiPietro for refusing to speak to her after Ayla’s disappearance. She said Tuesday on NBC’s “Today” show that they’ve now spoken, but she still wonders why he waited more than two weeks to make a public appearance to appeal for the return of their daughter.

Full Story and Video

ListenASec
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Based on what I've seen of

Based on what I've seen of her, I wouldn't be talking with the mother either.

JustaMainah
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Where, exactly, is DHHS in

Where, exactly, is DHHS in all of this? Surely with a broken arm, a drug addicted mother, and another baby in the picture someone in the euphemistically titled Child Protective Services is involved? Is this another case of the department pushing for "family reunification" at the expense of a child?

Roger Ek
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A decade or more ago, Maine

A decade or more ago, Maine took more kids away from families and kept them longer than any other state. The kids were shuffled from home to home to keep them from developing stable friendships with other kids. Then Deb Plowman got involved. She was the first to take a hard look at the system the kids called "the train". Yes, Maine has some abused kids, but Maine does not have the worst parents in the nation. It is not a crime to be poor. Keep the kids in the home with the parents and LET the parents go to work. Governor LerPage wants to reform the DHHS. Sen Deb Plowman can be a big help in this.

JustaMainah
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There is a fine line between

There is a fine line between ignorant neglect and intentional abuse. When a substance-abusing parent has been offered help and refuses it or has never been successfully rehabbed, when a child has been injured due to parental actions or inactions, or when there is a long history of complaints and lack of substantive change, that's when the state should step in. Right now, the philosophy of the department is reunification come hell or high water. I know because I've been on the gerbil wheel of DHHS involvement as a grandparent trying to get one of our grandkids out of the neglectful care of his parents (our son and his ex-girlfriend) and that system is so screwed up it defies logic. Basically, the parents have all the rights, the kids (and grandparents) get totally screwed over. Seriously, the bureaucratic BS is so maddening it would make even Mother Teresa say bad words! I'm not necessarily advocating for lots of kids to be taken from their parents, I'm advocating for neglected and abused kids being taken from their parents. Even when "jeopardy" has been established, the Dept. is all for reunification regardless of how crappy a deal that will be for the child. Even when another family member has stepped up and is willing to take the child, the Dept. will opt to pursue reunification. In a phone conversation with the AAG handling my grandson's case he said, "we will always look to reunification first. It is our stance that a child is nearly always better off with their family of origin than being placed with a stranger or even with extended family. Kids need their parents." What a lovely notion, but a bit unrealistic given the selfish, immoral, hedonistic people in this world, dontcha think?

I didn't mean to derail this thread, just was wondering aloud what, if anything, DHHS is doing in this case, if not for Ayla's sake but for the 9 month old that still needs to be protected.

Snowalker
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I guess you missed reading

I guess you missed reading the mother who is an out and out liar. Check out her body language,fake tears, and blaming everyone else. Being a hoodrat she has been exposed to all kinds of people that do this kind of stuff. She knew she wasn't going to get back custody so she had to make the father look worse than her. My thoughts are that the wee one is in Mass. and everyones in wayyyy over their heads. Ayla will more than likely show up at a copshop, or a church, or a firestation from a knock on the door and all alone. They scoffed her out the window in the dead of night and she had to go to someone she trusted to be taken out that window without a fuss.

Peter
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This is an awful situation,

This is an awful situation, all they way around.

Philip Roy
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Police seeking more tips in

Police seeking more tips in missing toddler case

Lt. Kevin Adam of the Maine Warden Service said two dives teams — one from the warden service and one from the state police — searched the icy river below the Hathaway Creative Center on Water Street and directly below the Carter Memorial Bridge.

Justin DiPietro, Ayla's father, said he learned about the river search on Tuesday.

"I spoke with investigators last night. They said, 'Don't be alarmed,'" DiPietro told the Morning Sentinel in a brief conversation.

Philip Roy
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SLIDESHOW: The river search
Philip Roy
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Dive teams search Kennebec

Dive teams search Kennebec River for Ayla Reynolds

Vidio at this site above

Wednesday’s underwater searches, which involved several divers, two airboats and numerous Maine State Police and Maine Marine Patrol personnel, marked the first time divers have been used in an attempt to locate 20-month-old Reynolds. Police have said repeatedly that DiPietro and Ayla’s mother, Trista Reynolds, have cooperated fully with investigators.

Empirefalls
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I understand this Waterville

I understand this Waterville missing child case will be on Nancy Grace tonight,Thu.Jan2012. I was listening to Mike Violette[WGAN] this morning, he mentioned he would be on [via audio] the Grace show.

edit

Tom C
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Looks like the police don't

Looks like the police don't know anything.

Philip Roy
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Ayla’s mother: ‘This isn’t

Ayla’s mother: ‘This isn’t how I wanted her to become a star’

...........snip......
“Ayla is my best friend,” said Reynolds on Wednesday. “I have told Ayla all of my deepest, darkest secrets. I’d tell her about my whole day. No matter what, Ayla would still look up at me with those eyes and that smile.”

Trista Reynolds holds her nine-month-old son Raymond Fortier during an interview with the BDN in Portland. She talked about her infant daughter Ayla, who went missing in December

Attached at the link above is a video. I have to learn how to post video. You have to see this video and make your own judgement

Snowalker
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awwwwwww No really I

awwwwwww No really I always talk with my eyes closed so i can try to remember which lie I already told and how i told it, and i would like to thank all my coaches before and during the interview. Is there any chance someone could buy me clothes?

Bruce Libby
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I haven't seen recent video

I haven't seen recent video but I always went professionally with eye contact or lack there of as a prime indicator of what is truth or not. Even this can be faked for a short while. Usually as things get more complex it gets harder to hide it.

I would not bet on police knowing nothing ,of course proving something is always the hard part.
There are really only two plausible scenarios here , one to get baby back to mom the other to get even with or something from daddy !
No matter what it is sad.

Snowalker
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You're certainly right there,

You're certainly right there, it is sad. I think you're right about them knowing something and just waiting it out.

Philip Roy
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Ayla's father took polygraph

Ayla's father took polygraph exam

WATERVILLE — The father of missing toddler Ayla Reynolds took a polygraph exam shortly after she disappeared, but neither he nor the police will say how he did.

It was four weeks ago Saturday that Justin DiPietro reported his 21-month-old missing.

“I asked for a polygraph on day one,” DiPietro said today during an interview with the Morning Sentinel. “I’ve taken one, and the results, I was never allowed to see them. It’s something you’re going to have to ask law enforcement about.”

thejohnchapman
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If they blab the results,

If they blab the results, they taint the jury pool. Good call. As for dad, he knows exactly what he did, or did not do. He really doesn't need the results either.

Jim Corr
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The police can't announce the

The police can't announce the results of the polygraph, but the father could! He knows whether he passed or failed the examination and the fact that he is deferring to the police tells me he either failed it or it was inconclusive.

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