HIPAA? Not for Dr. Facebook

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Toolsmith
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HIPAA? Not for Dr. Facebook

Yes, big tech is trespassing into areas traditionally highly regulated but does not comply with any of those safeguards.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/jan/30/facebook-is-predic...

Though the program may be well intentioned, there are many associated risks, which I describe in an upcoming article in the Yale Journal of Law and Technology. Some of those risks include high false positive rates leading to unnecessary hospitalization and forced medication, potentially violent confrontations with police, warrantless searches of one’s home, and stigmatization and discrimination against people labeled high risk for suicide.

Facebook and other social media platforms have been described as the new governors. They influence speech, the democratic process, and social norms. All the while, they are quietly becoming the new health regulators. Creating, testing, and implementing health technologies with no outside oversight or accountability. For everyone’s safety, state and federal regulators should take notice.

Just another indication that the Brave New World may not be a very nice place...

Thomas Carter
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First of all, I want to thank

First of all, I want to thank you for spelling the acronym “HIPAA” correctly. Having worked under HIPAA regulations, one of my pet peeves was seeing educated healthcare professionals spell it “HIPPA”. Repeatedly. Drove me nuts.

Facebook is getting creepier every day. I deleted mine forever. Don’t miss it. Selling everyone’s personal information is Orwellian, or Huxleyish, if you will.

The treatment of your electronic health record is equally frightening. Those who sell these programs to doctors and hospitals (there’s a big one located in Belfast), data mine information as well. These EHR companies also transmit your protected info to outsourced satellite centers in India and other foreign countries where HIPAA is unenforceable.

Legislation to strengthen HIPAA is way overdue.

Robert Reed
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TC - we agree - rare but true

TC - we agree - rare but true....as someone who works in Healthcare for almost 40 years, I see it far too often. If people only understood how vulnerable those records are and how those records can later be used against them by employers or by those opposed to their election to political office....

anonymous_coward
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This is a really interesting

This is a really interesting topic. You can't really say that one's public social media presence could be governed by HIPAA laws, any more than any other public free speech. But the *interpretation* of those data as a medical diagnosis is certainly something that should fall under the law.

Unclear to me how you draw that line, though.

Melvin Udall
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Schaeffer's Second Law of The

From an American Thinker article:

Each breakthrough in utility deriving from advances in the Global Digital Domain is accompanied by equal or greater vulnerabilities and potential detriments to quality of life. Translation: Anything that can do amazingly great things for you can almost always do terribly awful things to you as well.

Robert Reed
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Anonymous..I would only add

Anonymous..I would only add it should be covered under law "if the person making the acusation or comment was qualified to make such diagnoses"... as that would lend others to take credence in what is spoken.

anonymous_coward
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@Robert Reed: "Anonymous..I

@Robert Reed: "Anonymous..I would only add it should be covered under law "if the person making the acusation or comment was qualified to make such diagnoses"... as that would lend others to take credence in what is spoken."

What if someone just applies a machine learning algorithm? It's certainly not qualified to do anything (though it may be trained on data that was generated by qualified professionals).

And what if the machine does as well or better than professionals (as we have seen with things like mammogram analysis)?

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